Columns | Dogzine

Columns

I’m often told my dog is smart. I definitely agree with that. He knows that when our walking buddy’s come through the door, it’s time to get his ball.

Actually it's already been a little longer than a year since Don came into my life. It's been a rollercoaster of a year, but that's definitely not been a bad thing. 

Don is smart, very smart. Sometimes he's so smart that he confuses himself. Although he's an ADL dog, I was given lessons on how to train him to do anything I want him to do.

Although Don is trained as an ADL service dog, he does many things for me that he's not been trained to do. He's a sensitive dog and picks up people's feelings very easily.

I’m fluent in English and Dutch. I know a few words in German and Welsh and I know even fewer words in French.

I have a question for you. How do you know the difference between a Service Dog and a pet dog? 

Hi! Many people ask what I can do. So I got the chance to take over the MacBook and tell you all about a typical day as my human’s  Service Dog. 

Training with Don really felt like I was in school again. Everything I had learned and achieved some 14 years ago when training my Staffordshire Bull Terrier Cracker, had to go out of the window.

Although we were almost sure Don would be a good match, the only way to find out if there’s really a click is to let him stay with me for a week. On January 15th the big day came.

 One of the questions that came up multiple times while going through the process of matching me with a Service dog was: ‘How are you going to know where the dog is and if he’s completed a task for